November 13, 2010

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Photo Inspirations: 5 Unusual Perspectives

Next time you are out taking photos, and you want to add more interest to your images then just a “photojournalistic” recording of the event or place you visited, give these tips a try. Don’t worry, these tips don’t require a fancy camera or lens. These techniques can be used with the most basic point and shoot cameras, or even a cell phone.

Under The Eye
Under The Eye
by .: Philipp Klinger :.

1) Get Down Low

Look down, get down, and see what there is at a level you aren’t used to seeing. This works well to avoid “shooting down” at small people, animals and other “low” things. It helps to bring the viewer in the same plane as the subject.


Photo Owner


Photo Owner

2) Only the Shadow Knows…

Don’t be afraid of shadows. The most dramatic shadows come out at low sun angles, which is usually early morning and late evening. However, even mid-day shadows can be used for decorative flair. Look for intricate shadows with lots of contrast between light and dark areas.


Photo Owner


Photo Owner

3) Lean Over – Way Over

For traditional scenic photos, razor straight horizons are important. However, if you want to spice up the artistic value of an image, tilt your head and your camera. Many times a sloping perspective can enhance the “speed” of a dynamic object.


Photo Owner


Photo Owner

4) Zoom, Zoom and Zoom Again

Sometimes the best way to capture the detail of an entire image is to zoom in on only one part of the image. This technique alone can turn an otherwise boring photo into a very dramatic image. Most times people try to record too much info and destroy the very detail of a subject they are looking to capture. Look at the examples below and see how the close up of a door or hinge tell more about the location then would an average shot of some obscure building.


Photo Owner


Photo Owner


Photo Owner

5) Stop, Reflect, Contemplate

Capturing the reflection of an actual image can be a very powerful image. Sometimes the reflected image makes more of a statement than the actual image itself. Reflections can not only provide mirror symmetry when shooting streams and lakes, but can make very dramatic presentations of otherwise ordinary images. There is a reason many of the US Capital monuments are set in front of their own reflecting pool.


Photo Owner


Photo Owner


Photo Owner

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